Fitness Newbie? Read this getting started guide!

Fitness Newbie?

Get started with these 10 Tips For Success

Stepping into a new gym for the first time can be a bit intimidating and overwhelming.
You might see a bunch of people lifting really heavy things. Doing unfamiliar movements and using peculiar vocabulary. Fear not fitness newbie; these people won’t bite. They’re actually pretty friendly and supportive once you get to know them. It can be a lot to take in at first glance, especially if you’ve had limited exposure to functional fitness training prior to starting at FunFit. But don’t worry; we’ll look after you. The following are 10 things to keep in mind as you begin your FunFit journey.

1.) Have fun

Let’s face it, not all workouts are fun. But when it’s over, you feel a sense of accomplishment (or relief!). You shouldn’t be upset that you didn’t get as many reps as the person next to you. Don’t take yourself too seriously. Smile. Laugh. Introduce yourself to people you don’t know. If you’re not having fun, why are you here?  Do you enjoy your overall time spent at the gym? Do you enjoy the people, the community, the knowledge and support that it provides? If so, then don’t be too concerned with your competitive nature.

The things you’ll learn at FunFit are fun: making your life easier and helping you engage more. Learn new skills of controlling your own bodyweight, kettlebells, movement, olympic lifts. A lot of the stuff you can’t do in a Fitness First. The attitude is different too; the feeling you’ll have the first time you get an unassisted pull-up or move with effortlessness is an amazing sense of power and accomplishment.

fitness newbie: challenge yourself and have fun

2.) Don’t be afraid to ask for clarification, over and over again


It’s your time, money, and most importantly, health. If you don’t fully understand something, ask. If you still don’t get it, ask again. Don’t be afraid to ask for clarification if you don’t fully grasp the concept, or you think others in the class will get frustrated with you for taking up too much time. We were all a fitness newbie at one point. We’ve all been there. Learning the mechanics of certain movements like the squat, deadlift, or any of the olympic lifts takes lots of practice and critique from a trained eye. If you need help, just ask.

3.) You’re competing against yourself, not others


When it comes time to doing a workout, don’t feel like you have to do everything, or be able to complete as many rounds as other people right off the bat. Go at your own pace. Let the intensity find you. You need a solid foundation of strength and flexibility in order to progress into more demanding workouts.  Start light, get your form sorted out, and improve from there. Chase your own capacity before chasing the person next to you. Which brings me to my next point…

Fitness newbie: Leave your ego at the door

4.) Don’t be too proud to modify


Learn new movements. Progress to more complexity over time. You have to know your own body and its limits. Most importantly, there’s no substitute for common sense.

5.) What you eat is more important than what you lift

Nutrition is the key to every aspect of your life. It affects your energy levels, your recovery, and your overall defence against disease.

“Junk in, junk out.”

When you’re first starting out, the quality of your food is far more important than the quantity. Eat ‘cleanly’ (as much real food as possible / as little processed food as possible). If you’re eating as cleanly as possible, you don’t even need to worry about the quantity at this stage. You are a Ferrari. You wouldn’t put low quality fuel in a Ferrari, would you?


6.) Training isn’t everything


We are doing a strength and conditioning program that focuses on building general physical preparedness (GPP). It can improve almost every aspect of your life, but that doesn’t mean that it has to be your sport or your lifeblood. I train so that I can do whatever I want: Go out, play sports, learn new things. Having that GPP allows me to take on new challenges. Training is not my life. I train so that I can have a life… and get the most out of it.


7.) It doesn’t get easier, but you get better


Persevere. You get stronger, build a greater aerobic capacity, and become mentally tough.  All of these aspects, combined with experience, allow you to know when to push yourself and when to back off, so that you can do each workout to the best of your ability.

Fitness newbie: keep calm and do your best


8.) You won’t PR every day


Don’t mistake intensity for hard work. Even if you’re having a bad day and the intensity just isn’t there, you can still get a lot out of your time in the gym through hard work. Intensity and hard work are not the same thing. Don’t skip a planned session just because you’re feeling a bit flat. Not feeling too strong that day? That’s fine; scale back. Something is better than nothing.

9.) Respect rest and recovery


Too many people new to training (and even those of us who have been doing this a while) get caught up in over-training. Don’t be afraid to schedule in a de-load day once per week, or a de-load week every 4-6 weeks where you cut the weight, rounds, and intensity in half. You have to think about this from a longevity standpoint. If you’re killing yourself every time you step foot in the gym, week after week, month after month, year after year, you’re going to eventually break down. You need to respect your time outside of the gym. There’s an old weightlifting adage that goes something like: “You don’t get bigger and stronger from lifting weights, you get bigger and stronger from recovering from lifting weights.”

Proper nutrition, hydration and sleep all play their part in recovery, but you also need to listen to your body. If you continuously beat yourself down, you’re going to get hurt, injured or worse. Stay on top of your mobility work. Don’t know what that is? Ask!

10.) Thank yourself

Overcoming inertia and getting off the couch isn’t easy. Especially in winter. Thank yourself for making the effort, training consistently and reaping the rewards. You’re investing in yourself. It’s worth it. 🙂


So, what now?

You’ve made a commitment to yourself. You’re about to start eating better. Your vocabulary will soon include words like burpee, deadlift and snatch. See you in training. Welcome to FunFit.

Ready to get started? Get in touch!

Sydney Morning Herald: Paleo Diet Criticism

Paleo Diet Criticism

The Paleo Diet has been rising in popularity recently. So too has Paleo Diet criticism.

This post is a bit longer than usual – and hopefully not too ranty!

Paleo Diet Criticism

On the 5th August 2014, this article appeared in the Sydney Morning Herald newspaper:

http://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/diet-and-fitness/nutritionists-warn-of-dangers-in-paleo-dieting-20140805-100iup.html

This article is both interesting and error filled. Here are some points with which I took exception. (Some important, some trivial). My critique of the Paleo Diet Criticism will make most sense if you open that article in a new window, read it, and then read it in parallel to the points I’m making. I also wish to clarify certain misconceptions this newspaper article propagates about Paleo. Please don’t misunderstand me. My article is not a knee-jerk reaction to criticism of a lifestyle modification I think works for many people. It’s a reaction to a mischaracterization of Paleo. At the bottom of this article I have linked to a well written piece that is a legitimate Paleo diet criticism. Anyway, here we go!

“The Paleo diet might be heading for extinction, like the cavemen who inspired it…”

Cavemen are not extinct, they are our ancestors. If they were extinct we wouldn’t be here!

“…modern Paleo eating mimics the hunter-gatherer diet of our Paleolithic ancestors…”

Let’s be clear from the outset. Modern Paleo seeks to emulate rather than replicate hunter-gatherer diets. What do I mean by that is? Get ideas of officeworkers carrying clubs while wearing leopard skins out of your head. Forget starting fires with two sticks. This is not modern Paleo. Modern Paleo is eating unprocessed foods. Simple. If you can eat grains and legumes unprocessed, be my guest. Meat, you can. Vegetables, you can. Fruit, you can. Get the idea? That’s all Paleo is – unprocessed foods.

Stanton says we should applaud the low content of processed foods, sugar and salt advocated in Paleo diets but asks, “why exclude plant-based foods such as wholegrains and legumes when a wealth of evidence confirms their health value?

There is an argument to eating minimally processed grains and legumes, if you can tolerate them. (No abdominal bloating / gas / discomfort.) A lot of people (myself included) have ‘gastro-intestinal issues’ with beans. :/
I’m not convinced that grains and legumes do anything for you that a variety of vegetables don’t. Grains and legumes often displace vegetables on the plate. I think vegetables offer more nutritional value.

The article then says

…the chief executive of the Dietitians Association of Australia, Claire Hewat, says there is no scientific evidence to support eating the Paleo way.

yet then quotes her as saying

“A recent search of the published studies looking at Paleolithic diets revealed no more than 10 studies, all with very few participants over very short time frames – most less than three months. And many people dropped out of the studies, claiming the diet was difficult to follow,” Hewat says.

“No more than 10 studies” is not the same as “no scientific evidence”. So either the article mischaracterises or oversimplifies Hewat’s position, or, less likely, she conflates scant evidence as non-existent. It is the case that there have been few scientific studies of the Paleo Diet. These studies tend to be positive (like this one) but also tend to have small sample sizes. These are red flags. For what it’s worth, there is a study about Paleo being healthier than the Mediterranean diet. All nutrition studies have drop out rates.

“Any diet excluding whole food groups should raise suspicions”

yet the Dietitians Association of Australia (DAA) has no problem with vegetarianism…

“…eating more meat than is needed by the body certainly has risks”.

Yes. So does drinking too much water. Not limited to red meat, the only risk of consuming too much protein I know is for people with existing kidney disease.

“Claims that our ancestors did not experience heart disease, cancer and diabetes ignore the fact that few people lived past their reproductive age and physical activity ensured people were lean.”

I don’t know about historical disease rates, so won’t speak to that. Staffan Lindberg’s Food and Western Disease talks in depth about Papua New Guinean hunter-gatherers, nutrition and disease. Follow that rabbit hole if you dare! In any case, few people living past reproductive age is a great example of not understanding ‘life expectancy from birth’. (A population without sanitation, for example, will have higher infant mortality – which will bring down the life expectancy figure. Fewer people making it out of childhood doesn’t necessarily mean adults died before they got old…

“Two major hazards associated with the Paleo diet are the high content of red meat and the lack of wholegrains”

Covered the wholegrains thing above.
Red meat. Ahhh!. I sigh for two reasons.

  1. Red meat is delicious!
  2. The (too much) red meat is bad for you trope. Or tripe. :p

Let’s address number two, as number one is self evident to most people. 🙂
Most ‘meat’ studies don’t discriminate between red and processed meats. D The ‘red meat increases your risk of obesity / diabetes / cancer boat is turning. Slowly, but surely.

This review and meta-analysis from 2010 found:

Consumption of processed meats, but not red meats, is associated with higher incidence of CHD and diabetes mellitus. These results highlight the need for better understanding of potential mechanisms of effects and for particular focus on processed meats for dietary and policy recommendations.

Then there’s this study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, September 2014 studied approximately 75,000 people over 15 years, looking specifically at the difference in survival between red and processed meat eaters. This is what that study said:

High red meat consumption is associated with an increased mortality risk. This association is partly explained by the negative effect of processed meat consumption, which is widely established. The role of nonprocessed meat is unclear.

Not too controversial so far… let’s see the conclusion!

We found that high total red meat consumption was associated with progressively shorter survival, largely because of the consumption of processed red meat. Consumption of nonprocessed red meat alone was not associated with shorter survival.

So sausages and porterhouse steak don’t have the same effects on health? Wow!

The Paleo diet can be expensive. So is medical care in later life. If you’d like to see how you can manage the Paleo Diet on a budget then please check this out

Paleo is often characterised as ‘low-carb’. It can be, but often it’s just ‘lower carb’ than eating cereal for breakfast, a roast potato for lunch and pasta for dinner. Pretty much any version of Paleo you see will have the proponent suggest you match carb intake to activity level.

Paleo (done right) isn’t a fad. It’s a healthy way of eating that works for many people.
Effort = results. If you aren’t committed to making lasting change then no lifestyle change will last.
That’s not Paleo’s fault or a controversial statement. That’s reality.

That being said, if Paleo doesn’t work for you – do something else!

If you’re really keen – you could have a look at the Dietitians Association of Australia website. Specifically the sponsors – major partners and associate partners. I believe the DAA has a conflict of interest in their position. Feel free to draw your own conclusions as to why this criticism of the growing Paleo movement may have come about…

Please don’t settle for half-baked criticisms and straw men.

If you’d like to read an excellent article that makes legitimate criticisms of Paleo then check out 4 valid criticisms of the Paleo Diet by Jaime Hartman at GutsyByNature.

As always, please share your thoughts in the comments.

Recipe: Choc Raspberry Cupcakes

Choc Raspberry Cupcakes

Gluten, Dairy and Guilt Free!

Makes 12 cupcakes

Choc Cupcake

Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 cup of almond meal
  • 3 tablespoons of coconut flour
  • 1/2 cup of coconut sugar
  • 1/4 cup of unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 teaspoon of baking powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon of sea salt
  • 2 tablespoons of coconut oil
  • 1 cup of almond or coconut milk
  • 1 teaspoon of vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon of vanilla extract
  • 1 tablespoon of honey
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 cup of frozen raspberries

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 160 degrees. Grease a 12 holed cupcake tin.
  2. Place almond meal, coconut flour, coconut sugar, cocoa, baking powder and salt together in a bowl. Stir together and make a well in the middle.
  3. Melt coconut oil until liquid. To the milk, add vinegar and vanilla extract. Stir to combine.
  4. Pour liquids (including eggs) into the well and combine until just combined.
  5. Add raspberries and fold through.
  6. Spoon mixture equally into cupcake tin.
  7. Place in oven on middle or lower shelf. Cook for about 25 minutes or until the tops bounce when you press lightly.
  8. Take it out of the oven. Let it cool completely before carefully lifting it out of the tin.
  9. Bon appetit!?li>

The adventurous might like to top the choc raspberry cupcakes with:

Avocado Chocolate Icing / Mousse Dip

Ingredients

  • 2 avocados, peeled and deseeded
  • 1/4 cup of cacao powder
  • 2 tablespoons of coconut oil
  • 1/4 cup of coconut milk
  • 3 tablespoons of coconut sugar
  • 1-2 tablespoons of maple syrup or honey
  • 1 teaspoon of cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon of mixed spice
  • 1/2 teaspoon of chilli powder (optional)

Method

  1. Place all ingredients in a bowl. Blend with a spatula (or electric mixer) until smooth.
  2. Serve as icing on cake/cupcakes or mousse dip with fresh fruit. Freeze it to make ice cream or eat its goodness all by itself!
  3. Thanks to Chirotherapy for this great choc raspberry cupcakes recipe!

    You could also try these snack and dessert ideas: Cheesecake and Chocolate Brownies.

    Do you have a favourite healthy snack or dessert you’d like to share?

Recipe: Kale Chips for the win!

Kale Chips: Undiscovered wonderland.

I only got on to these recently. Boy, I’m glad I did!

For those of you who barely know what kale is, let alone how you would make it into chips – here it is:
kale chips

What is Kale?

Kale is a vegetable with green or purple leaves, in which the central leaves do not form a head. It is considered to be close to wild cabbage. It’s in the same group of vegetables as broccoli, cauliflower, collard greens, and brussels sprouts. When baked or dehydrated, kale takes on a consistency similar to that of a potato chip. Curly kale varieties are usually preferred for chips. The chips can be seasoned with salt or other spices.

Kale is very high in beta carotene, vitamin K, vitamin C, and rich in calcium. It has been found to contain a group of resins known as bile acid sequestrants, which have been shown to lower cholesterol and decrease absorption of dietary fat.

When you combine this healthy goodness with the texture of the chip – magic happens!

How to make kale chips

To make kale chips there are a few things to remember:

  • The kale leaves must be DRY.
  • Bake the kale at 170°C.
  • Cook the chips for 12 minutes.
  • Salt AFTER the kale chips are out of the oven.

Here’s what you need to make your own chips:

  • A bunch of kale
  • 1 tablespoon of avocado oil
  • Sea salt (or your favourite seasoning salt)

Here’s what to do:

  • Preheat the oven to 170°C.
  • Remove the leaves from the stems and wash the leaves well.
  • In small batches – spin the leaves dry in a salad spinner.
  • Toss the dry leaves with avocado oil and use your hands to distribute the oil evenly.
  • Line a baking sheet with baking paper and lie some of the leaves on top in a single layer.
  • Make sure the leaves are all flat and not folded over or they won’t crisp properly.
  • Pop the tray in the oven and after 12 minutes, your kale chips will be done!

Once the kale’s out of the oven, season the chips with some sea salt or your favourite seasoning salt.
Bon appetit!

DO NOT miss the deadline or your chips will be BITTER.

Please also check out more recipe ideas for breakfast, lunch, dinner and dessert.

Try delicious Paleo Chocolate Brownie Bites

Paleo Chocolate Brownie Balls

This delicious Paleo Chocolate brownie recipe is a version of the one I found on Paleogrubs.com.
Where they used walnuts only, I decided to use mixed nuts. You can get a 250g or 500g bag of almonds, brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts, walnuts and pecans from the supermarket.

For a dessert or sweet snack this is hard to beat. This chocolate brownie mix is easy to make, delicious and nutritious. You know exactly what’s in it. There are no additives or preservatives. The nuts provide a good source of protein and healthy fats. The raw cacao is high in antioxidants. The only trouble you’ll have with these brownies is having them last long!

Ingredients

  • 250g of raw mixed nuts
  • 100g of pitted dates
  • 1 tsp of vanilla extract
  • 1/3 of a cup of raw cacao powder
  • A pinch of salt

Instructions

  • Add nuts and salt to a blender or food processor. Mix until the nuts are finely ground.
  • Add the dates, vanilla, and cacao powder to the blender. Mix well until everything is combined.
  • With the blender still running, add a couple drops of water at a time to make the mixture stick together.
  • Using a spatula, transfer the mixture into a bowl. Using your hands, form small round balls, rolling in your palm.
  • Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to a week.

For other sweet deliciousness, please check out this Paleo Cheesecake recipe.

Paleo Cheesecake Recipe

Paleo Cheesecake

This is a version of a Paleo “Cheesecake” Recipe I found at paleocupboard.com

This recipe is gluten and dairy free – and actually tastes really good. At Christmas I even got complimented on it’s tastiness from my mother in law!

A couple of major diversions from the original include using raspberries rather than blackberries (out of season) and using the actual raspberry ‘pulp’ as a topping, rather than the juice as a compote. You can freeze the juice to make popsicles if you have the equipment.

Ingredients Directions
CRUST TO MAKE THE CRUST
  • 1 1/2 cups raw almonds
  • 10 pitted dates
  • 2 Tbsp. raw honey
  • 1/2 tsp. sea salt
Blend the almonds for about 5 seconds. Add the dates and honey and blend until the dough sticks together. Take your pan and press the dough into the pan and along the sides. Place the crust in the refrigerator while you work on the other layers.
FILLING TO MAKE THE FILLING
  • 3 cups soaked cashews
  • 1/2 cup lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup coconut oil
  • 2/3 cup raw honey
  • 1 Tbsp. vanilla extract
Blend the cashews for about 15 seconds. Add the remaining filling ingredients and blend until very smooth. Pour the filling into the crust, making sure the top is smooth, and return to the refrigerator.
TOPPING TO MAKE THE TOPPING
  • 2 1/2 cups raspberries
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 2 Tbsp. raw honey
  • 1 Tbsp. vanilla extract
1. Place the raspberries and water in a medium sized saucepan over medium heat. Allow the berries to cook down (about 15 minutes), stirring regularly. Add the raw honey and vanilla extract and stir to combine. Place the berry mixture in a fine mesh strainer held over a small bowl. Press the mixture with the back of a spoon in order to extract as much of the liquid as possible. Spoon the berry “pulp” over the top of the filling layer, making sure it is evenly distributed out to the crust layer. Allow to chill in the fridge for at least 2 hours before serving.

Paleo Cheesecake CrustPaleo Cheesecake Crust and FillingPaleo Cheesecake

Recipe: You want Paleo Pizza? Hello Meatza!

Paleo Pizza, known as Meatza is delicious and nutritious.

When I went Paleo I missed pizza. Thankfully, there is something you can have that is even better.

Try it and you’ll see. It is at least as good as, if not better than, pizza.
This is a recipe suggestion. As with pizza tastes do vary considerably.
If there’s something on here you don’t like then by all means remove it or substitute something else. Better that than not trying meatza-goodness!

Try googling Meatza and see the variety.

Preparation Time: About 10 minutes
Cooking Time: About 40 minutes

Ingredients:

(For the base)
1 kg beef mince
1 egg
Herbs (chilli, basil and oregano)
Tomato paste or passata sauce

(Toppings)
Olives
Tinned Peas, Carrots and Corn
Tinned Asparagus
Tinned Pineapple
Fetta Cheese
Shredded tasty cheese

Cooking Instructions:

Preheat oven to 180 degrees
Crack the egg into a large mixing bowl
Add herbs
Add mince
Mix thoroughly
Grab a flat baking tray with a decent lip as there is some meat juice
Flatten the mixture on to the baking tray about 1/2 cm thick
(You could make it square, circular or make multiple mini ‘pizzas’ at this point

When the oven is at temperature bake the base for 20 minutes

Take it out and drain the juice (you could keep it for stock)
Add tomato paste or passata sauce in a thin coat – leaving space at the edge for fingers!
Add olives, peas, carrots, corn, asparagus, pineapple and fetta.
Layer the tasty cheese over the top and put it back in the oven for another 20 minutes.

Bon apetite!

Paleo Diet Position Update

Science encourages us to constantly update our ideas – so here’s my update on my position on “Paleo” eating.

We start with a hypothesis, work out measurement criteria, and rigorously test.
If the hypothesis is supported by evidence we accept it – until such time as something better comes along. If the hypothesis is not supported by evidence we reject it – and hopefully something better comes along.

As someone who tries to base decisions on these tenets – I feel it’s time to give you an update on my position on “the Paleo diet”.

Those of you who know me know that I’ve been a proponent of the Paleo diet for a few years now. The reason for choosing it was at the time it seemed to have a sound internal logic to it that elegantly encapsulated what is now starting to be referred to as “evolutionary medicine.”
A fundamental principle being the Dobzhansky quote “Nothing in biology makes sense except in light of evolution.” Paleo espouses:
“eat what your ancestors ate because that’s what you have adapted to eating.” The ‘trouble’ is there is no one “Paleo” diet. Depending on your latitude you may be eating a huge variety of food, and to suggest there is only one way is misguided.

I would describe humans as opportunistic omnivores.
There is no such thing as a toxic substance – only a toxic dose.

Rather than thinking about food in binary terms: as ‘good’ or ‘bad’, perhaps a more useful way would be so visualise a scale or continuum. I would grade the scale based on nutrient density per kilojoule (this is the volume of vitamins and minerals relative to the energy load.) “Real food” tends to be at one end, some processed foods appear in the middle, and what everyone would agree is ‘junk’ appears at the bad end. Then the trick is eating the ‘good’ stuff, having some ‘middle’ stuff, avoiding the ‘bad’ stuff – and not eating too much of any of it.

Paleo Diet

The common theme that’s running through the “optimal diet” is eating real food.
Unlike processed foods there tends to be high nutrient density relative to kilojoules contained.

Wild Salmon Broccoli Sweet Potato Potato White Rice Pasta Kit Kat

The links above point to nutritiondata.com. Here you can find nutritional breakdowns of a huge variety of food, including macro and micro nutrient ratios (vitamins and minerals), protein profiles, inflammation factor, glycaemic indices, fullness factor and other information.

USA trip food

Back from the United States of America with a head full of ideas and a heart full of motivation.

Just a quick word today about my observations about the food choices available on the road in the US.

It seems to me that the USA really is the land of opportunity – and food is no exception. The ability to choose incredibly unhealthy options (deep fried sugary/salty/fatty foods in dizzying variety – chicken fried steak anyone?). This may contribute to a perception that Americans are an unhealthy bunch – especially when you look at the obesity figured presented in the media. This land of opportunity also allows the people to choose amazing, healthy, tasty dishes that by Australian standards are really cheap.

Anyone for a monster salad of meat/seafood/poultry with avocado, pine nuts, rocket, baby spinach, tomato, cucumber, dates, boiled eggs and other assorted yumminess for $6?!

I recognize the socio-economic divide that contributes to the unhealthy nutrition of the poorer Americans. All I’m saying is that the healthy options are there. Now we just need to let the good stuff get to more Americans.

And Australians.

Protein: The Building Blocks of Life

There is no process in the body that does not require protein. They truly are the building blocks of life. Protein is essential for proper immune function, effective and safe detoxification, creating and maintaining lean muscle, stabilizing sugar levels, producing energy and controlling weight.

Women need to consume 0.75g x their body weight (in kg) in protein a day whereas men need to consume 0.85g x their body weight, depending on activity level. Those over 70 years of age need to consume 1g for every kilogram they weigh, as do pregnant and breastfeeding women.

A good and easy habit to start is including protein in every meal and snack. Each main meal should contain a palmful of lean animal protein (e.g: turkey chicken, fish) or two palmfuls of vegetarian protein (e.g; tofu, lentils, nuts).

High protein snacks help to keep us full and stop us from snacking on junk food. Examples include a boiled egg, a can of tuna, a protein shake and nuts.

Diets high in protein also need you to keep up or increase your water intake so bottoms up!

Meat sources of protein contain about 30g of protein per 100g while twice from a non-meat source will give you the same value.

How much Protein do you need?

Males

______ (kg) x 0.85 = _____ (grams/day)

Females

______(kg) x 0.75 = ______ (grams/day)

Breastfeeding mothers and those over 70 years of age

_______(kg) x 1 = ________ (grams/day)

Article thanks to Mei Wong of Chirotherapy